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Humane Society looking for foster parents

By JOYANNA LOVE/ Managing Editor

The Humane Society of Chilton County is asking for help caring for animals after an influx of 40 animals.

The organization is hoping to place some of the animals in the care of foster families to keep numbers at the shelter down.

“Due to COVID-19 it is very difficult to impossible to have them spayed/neutered for adoptions,” according to the Humane Society of Chilton County Facebook page. “Cats and kittens especially get sick in a shelter environment. Call the shelter today or post here and message us your contact information to volunteer to house even one of these animals.”

Animal shelter director Jen Fesmire said people willing to foster are often needed for animals that are going to go to a rescue organization, those too young to be adopted and animals that have “special needs that need a little more time and care before adoption.”

Fosters might also be used, such as in this case, for a shelter animal “waiting for their forever home.”

“Foster parents must be at least 19 years of age,” Fesmie said. “They must have extra time to commit to an additional dog/cat in their home. Host families provide their guest with food, water, shelter, basic obedience and a safe and loving environment.”

She cautioned that potential foster families should consider the “emotional aspect” that will be involved before making a decision to foster.

Those who already own animals must have their pets up to date current vaccinations. “The foster family may need to provide transportation to and from the shelter, or to and from the vet,” Fesmire said.

Some rescue organizations are still transporting animals, and this will help get some animals out of the shelter.

The shelter uses Alabama Spay/Neuter Clinic for its animals, and it has closed during the pandemic.

“Available veterinarian spay/neuter appointments are few and far between,” a Humane Society of Chilton County post stated.

The hours of operation at the shelter have also been changed during this time.

The animal shelter is open Monday, Wednesday and Friday from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. with no intakes after 2 p.m. It is also open to the public on the first and third Saturday of the month from 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. with no intakes after 1 p.m.

“We are now accepting intakes; however, it is best if you call and make an appointment, “the organization stated on its Facebook. “Only one person at a time will be allowed inside the shelter to adopt or surrender a pet. Masks are not mandatory, but are highly recommended. Social distancing will apply.”